genetic privacy

New York Senator Charles Schumer cautions that genetic testing companies could sell consumers' genetic data, the New York Post reports.

Keep It Secret

A cryptographic approach could help researchers keep genomic data private while researchers analyze it, Scientific American reports.

Stanford University researchers have adapted a cryptographic technique for use in genomic analysis.

Parent firm Gene by Gene calls the law "brief and vague" and is pushing for ancestry testing to be exempt from the provision of the genetic privacy statute.

The Canadian government is asking for the constitutionality of the country's new anti-genetic discrimination law to be assessed, Bloomberg BNA reports.

For All the 'Mutants'

An opinion piece in the New York Times urges lawmakers to keep genetic protections in place.

This iteration of the contest focused on stronger security for beacon queries, secure patient matching, and computing on encrypted genomes in the cloud.

Secured With Noise

A trio of researchers presents a differential privacy approach to protect people with data in genomic databases, Nature News reports.

The Genetic Research Privacy Protection Act would ensure that federally funded researchers can't reveal genetic data that can identify study participants.

There You Are

With a few queries, Stanford researchers show that individuals can be identified in beacon networks.

Pages

What happens to scientific papers when certain journals are no longer published? Some scientists are trying to make sure they don't disappear forever.

A study in Microbiome finds that heavy drinkers have an unhealthy mix of bacteria in their mouths.

Doctors and patients are still trying to figure out what role at-home genetic testing should play in healthcare, Newsweek says.

In Genome Research this week, mismatch repair deficiency in C. elegans, retracing transcriptions start site evolution in the human genome, and more.