genetic privacy

The new analysis also uncovered knowledge gaps about why people are worried about genetic privacy.

The two papers published today in Science and Cell have implications for both forensics and genetic research.

In an editorial, the Washington Post calls on Congress to develop privacy standards to govern genetic testing companies.

The protocol could lead to greater regulatory harmonization in Europe, where every country has its own national legislation covering genetic testing.

It will be possible to upload genomic data to Australia's My Health Record system, which has raised privacy issues, the Sydney Morning Herald reports.

Indian DTC genomics company Mapmygenome has enlisted Israel-based Digital DNAtix to move its interpretation and personalized medicine services to a blockchain.

Support and Trust

My Gene Counsel's Ellen Matloff says Facebook needs to regain the trust of patient groups that used its closed groups for support.

A number of consumer genetic testing companies are adopting best practice guidelines for customer privacy, the Washington Post reports.

MyHeritage experienced a data breach in which all of its users' email addresses were exposed, according to Stat News.

Consent — and the right to withdraw it — underlies the EU's newly effective General Data Protection Regulation for researchers in Europe and beyond.

Pages

An artificial intelligence-based analysis suggests a third group of ancient hominins likely interbred with human ancestors, according to Popular Mechanics.

In Science this week: reduction in bee phylogenetic diversity, and more.

The New York Times Magazine looks into paleogenomics and how it is revising what's know about human history, but also possibly ignoring lessons learned by archaeologists.

The Economist reports on Synthorx's efforts to use expanded DNA bases they generated to develop a new cancer drug.