financial estimates

For the last three months of 2018, Invitae reported $45.4 million in revenues compared to $25.4 million in Q4 2017, beating the consensus Wall Street estimate.

The company will compete by continuing product improvements, ramping up marketing presence, and launching an app to improve doctor and consumer engagement.

The firm reported total revenu 16.8 million, up from $187.9 million in Q2 2018 and just above analysts' average estimate.  

The index, which outperformed the Dow Jones and the Nasdaq this month, gained 11 percent and rebounded from its 11 percent loss in December.

The company said it expects revenues from its ePlex analyzers to go up approximately 110 percent year over year for Q4.

The company's CEO noted softness in both its diagnostics and life science segment. The projected revenues would fall short of the consensus Wall Street estimate.

The firm expects Q4 revenues to be in the $132 million to $133 million range, up 15 to 16 percent from a year ago and consistent with the consensus Wall Street estimate.

In a preliminary financial report, the company said it is expecting revenues of more than $144 million and to have tested more than 300,000 samples.

The firm reported that it expects product and service revenue of approximately $23.5 million for the fourth quarter of last year and $83.5 million for full-year 2018.

The company said 100 US transplant centers provided its AlloSure kidney transplant test to almost 3,400 patients in Q4.

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NPR reports that researchers in Italy are testing a gene drive aimed at controlling mosquito populations.

Researchers may experience the effects of the government shutdown for a while, the Los Angeles Times reports.

A new study finds that the majority of patients at a Tijuana clinic received a diagnosis after first-line genome sequencing, the San Diego Union-Tribune reports.

In Genome Biology this week: post-transcriptional modification-based stratification of glioblastoma, single-cell analysis of gene expression and methylation in human iPSCs, and more.