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In Science this week: open genetic genealogy databases can lead to the identification of individuals who have not sought testing, and more.

The ID Core XT is the second molecular assay approved by the FDA for use in transfusion medicine and the first to report genotypes as final results.

Mayo Clinic researchers found that cytogenetic subtypes containing three translocations were more common in individuals with a greater proportion of African ancestry.

The tool allows users to search for unexpected modifications and other phenomena that are difficult to identify using conventional mass spec search software.

In Nature this week: full UK Biobank dataset published, shark genomes give glimpse into cartilaginous fish evolution, and more.

New England Biolabs is using Avacta's affimers with a development-stage research and diagnostic assay that could launch as early as next year.

The UK Biobank has collected genotyping, medical, and other phenotypic data on nearly 500,000 individuals, which it says will fuel additional studies.

A team from the EPFL has identified the chemical NTCB as a potential digestion reagent for middle-down work, though bioinformatic hurdles still remain.

In Genome Research this week: novel nematode gene families, approach to characterize nuclear bodies and other large ribonucleoprotein complexes, and more.

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The Washington Post writes that the approval in the US of a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine will be up to Peter Marks, a career official at the Food and Drug Administration.

According to ScienceInsider, the US National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine is planning a study of racism in academic research.

NPR reports the US loan to Eastman Kodak to boost domestic pharmaceutical production is on pause following insider trading allegations.

In Cell this week: blood immune cell changes in COVID-19 patients and spatial transcriptomics in Alzheimer's disease.