delisting

Nasdaq told the firm on Tuesday that its shares failed to maintain a minimum bid price of $1 per share for at least 30 consecutive trading days.

The firm had been notified in November that it failed to meet a listing requirement calling for at least $2.5 million in stockholder equity and faced delisting action. 

Interpace hopes to keep its stock listed on the Nasdaq as a result of the reverse split. 

As of Nov. 21 the company evidenced a closing bid price of its common stock in excess of the $1 minimum requirement for at least 10 consecutive trading days.

The company has received a number of warnings from the Nasdaq over the past year for its failure to meet the exchange's $35 million market value and $1 minimum bid price requirements.

The suspension results from the firm's failure to comply with Nasdaq listing requirements covering stockholders' equity and market capitalization.

The reverse stock split was done in order for BG Medicine to remain listed on Nasdaq, which had warned the firm in September of possible delisting action.

The company's stock failed to meet the exchange's $1 minimum bid requirement.

The Australian firm regained compliance with a listing rule requiring a minimum $2.5 million in stockholder equity.

The company borrowed $2 million pursuant to an amendment to a $12 million credit agreement. It also said that it has until June 19 to meet certain listing requirements. 

Pages

Technology Review reports that researchers in the US have used CRISPR to modify a number of human embryos.

Plant researchers plan to sequence some 10,000 samples that represent the major plant clades, ScienceInsider reports.

By introducing genes from butterfly peas and Canterbury bells, researchers in Japan have developed a blue chrysanthemum, according to NPR.

In Nature this week: a Danish reference genome, and more.