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consumer genomics

Among the initial crop of products there may not be a killer app yet, but these first offerings will enable Helix and partners to begin to understand their customer base.

With choice, real-time interpretation, low pricing, and education, Helix believes it may have cracked the formula for integrating genomics into people's daily lives.

NantOmics hopes to enhance its diagnostics platform with the addition of Genos' sequencing technology and expertise.

With the $250 service, Color is hoping to broaden access to genetic testing and make it easier for researchers to incorporate genetics in their studies. 

Launching a diverse product pipeline will also test Helix's ability to manage the challenges of providing genomics interpretations to a broad consumer audience.

The consumer genomics firm Helix will use an FDA-cleared device from OraSure's subsidiary DNA Genotek for collecting DNA samples from customers. 

The new assay, called the CellMax-DNA Genetic Cancer Risk Test, will complement CellMax Life's planned slate of liquid biopsy assays for early cancer detection.

The company has decided to put its direct-to-consumer sequencing campaign on hold after receiving a letter from the FDA.

The new company believes it can be the dominant clearinghouse for genome analysis apps or other tools, with free and unlimited storage of users' genomic data.

As many as 10,000 Nevadans will get free genetic testing through a large population health study being conducted by non-profit care network Renown Health. 

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The Wall Street Journal looks into FamilyTreeDNA's handling of genetic genealogy searches by law enforcement.

In a point-counterpoint in the Boston Globe, researchers discuss the potential of gene editing to prevent Lyme disease, but also the pitfalls of doing so.

MIT's Technology Review reports that researchers hope to develop a CRISPR-based pain therapy.

In Science this week: atlas of malaria parasites' gene expression across their life cycles, and more.