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consumer genomics

Earlier this week, the company launched Genomic Explorer in the US, a web-based service that enables consumers to upload their genomic data for viewing and analysis.

Last month, Helix launched an online marketplace of consumer genomics applications including ones for fitness, ancestry, and disease risk.

The latest offering puts the genetic testing company on the path toward becoming what it calls a preventive health service company.

Illumina received more orders than expected for NovaSeq in Q2 and sees a big opportunity in the consumer genomics market for its array business and Helix.

Parent firm Gene by Gene calls the law "brief and vague" and is pushing for ancestry testing to be exempt from the provision of the genetic privacy statute.

Among the initial crop of products there may not be a killer app yet, but these first offerings will enable Helix and partners to begin to understand their customer base.

With choice, real-time interpretation, low pricing, and education, Helix believes it may have cracked the formula for integrating genomics into people's daily lives.

NantOmics hopes to enhance its diagnostics platform with the addition of Genos' sequencing technology and expertise.

With the $250 service, Color is hoping to broaden access to genetic testing and make it easier for researchers to incorporate genetics in their studies. 

Launching a diverse product pipeline will also test Helix's ability to manage the challenges of providing genomics interpretations to a broad consumer audience.

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23andMe and Airbnb have partnered to offer "heritage travel," according to Venture Beat.

China may include regulations protecting genes and embryos in its update of its civil code, Nature News reports.

In Nature this week: exome sequence analysis of individuals with type 2 diabetes, genomic prediction of maize yield across environments, and more.

NPR reports on efforts to engineer bacteriophages to destroy antibiotic-resistance bacteria.