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consumer genomics

The clinical decision support content developer is integrating genetic testing information into its knowledgebase to assist physicians at the point of care.

Despite the step-up in FDA action against labs offering PGx tests, the success of these programs suggests that access to them isn't being stifled as some feared.

The acquisition, slated to close in the coming days, will give Invitae access to Clear Genetics' chatbot Gia, or Genetic Information Assistant.

The decade-long project will no longer enroll participants, but research using the collected data will continue.

The company launched a "core" service using Illumina microarray genotyping, and has plans for an expanded NGS offering with Quest Diagnostics.

The companies will offer customers a way to mine 23andMe's customer base for subjects with specific genetic or clinical features, and design and conduct a trial around them.

As part of the shift, DNA.Land, which was run as an academic research project, will delete all data by the end of the month and ask customers to resubmit it.

The Cancer Journal documented 25 cases where inappropriate tests were ordered, variants were interpreted incorrectly, and wrong results were reported to patients. 

While the FDA has expressed concerns about PGx testing, CEO Erik Hennings said the company has taken measures to limit the risk of consumer harm.

23andMe customers who have one of three common variants identified in reports can choose six family members to receive health and ancestry test kits.

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Public health experts call for a transparent COVID-19 vaccine approval process in a letter; the Food and Drug Administration commissioner assures science-based approval.

The Verge reports that new gene-naming guidelines aim in part to avoid Excel-related name change confusion.

In Nature this week: tuatara genome sequence aids in understanding amniote evolution, and more.

According to the Guardian, UK virologists say in a letter to officials that their expertise has been pushed aside in COVID-19 response plans.