consortium | GenomeWeb


Three papers published this week offer fine-grained detail about the Exome Aggregation Consortium's analysis and methods, showing the data's value in a specific use case.

The Human Cancer Models Initiative aims to create about 1,000 cancer cell lines that scientists can use to study tumor progression, drug resistance, and more.

Consortium researchers will use the STARPlatform to manage whole exome and genome sequence from patients with three diffuse glioma subtypes.

The Food Allergy Science Initiative seeks to supply the basic scientific research needed to spur future development of diagnostics and therapeutics.

The researchers will use Sapientia to analyze samples from 1,000 fetuses as part of efforts to develop an exome-based assay for non-invasive prenatal testing.

MetaSUB researchers will sample high-traffic areas across subway systems, buses, and parks in cities such as New York, San, Francisco, Buenos Aires, Sydney, and London.

Called CanPathPro, the research consortium aims to combine omics data and systems biology tools into a single commercial platform for testing cancer hypotheses.

Within the consortium community healthcare systems can contribute and access each other's data on cancer patients' molecular profiles and treatment outcomes.

As part of the effort, Virus.X also aims to craft new sequencing approaches, bioinformatics tools, and targeted gene products.

The Ontario Institute for Cancer Research will work with prostate cancer data while Dana Farber Cancer Institute's pilot has yet to be decided.


Kuwait says it will alter its law requiring citizens and visitors to provide DNA samples, New Scientist reports.

In Science this week: convergent evolution in bird hemoglobin, and more.

The Wall Street Journal speaks with patients affected by questionable test results from Theranos.

Researchers link variants in TACR3 to hot flashes during menopause, Live Science reports.