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commercialization agreement

The agreement marks Veracyte's first deal to expand the testing menu on the nCounter instrument since it acquired the rights to the platform from NanoString in December.

The partners are planning to develop and commercialize UroMap, a urine-based gene-expression test for acute cellular rejection in kidney transplant recipients.

Biocartis will lead commercialization in Europe as the exclusive distributor of the SeptiCyte Rapid test, while Immunexpress will lead commercialization of the test in the US.

The company recently inked deals with Mammoth Biosciences and Rutgers University to license a protein discovery platform and gene editing technology.

Eurobio Scientific will also develop new test kits for the T-COR 8, a real-time PCR thermocycler originally developed for the US Army.

Under the agreement, Theradiag will promote, license, and distribute PredictImmune's PredictSure IBD test in France, Belgium, Luxembourg, Switzerland, and the Maghreb countries. 

Under the deal, KSL will commercialize and facilitate orders of the PredictSURE IBD test throughout North America and will also process all samples through its laboratory, KSL Diagnostics.

The partners will use Adaptive's  ClonoSeq assay to assess minimal residual disease in several of Amgen's hematology drug development programs.

The company's new KidneyCare test will include AlloSure for rejection, AlloMap for quiescence, and Cibiltech's AI algorithm for graft health information.

Idylla molecular testing instruments will be placed at Covance sites to support customer needs for clinical trials and to validate and implement companion diagnostic applications.

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New analyses indicate female researchers are publishing less during the coronavirus pandemic than male researchers, according to Nature News.

A study suggests people with the ApoE e4 genotype may be more likely to have severe COVID-19 than those with other genotypes, the Guardian says.

Direct-to-consumer genetic testing companies are searching for a genetic reason for why some people, but not others, become gravely ill with COVID-19, the Detroit Free Press reports.

In PNAS this week: forward genetics-base analysis of retinal development, interactions of T cell receptors with neoantigens in colorectal cancer, and more.