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Asia/Oceania

In PNAS this week: spatial transcriptomic approach for quantifying RNA transcripts within subcellular compartments, proteomic study of dental samples from individuals who lived during Ireland's Great Famine, and more.

The company will work with the Genome Institute of Singapore to create a test for breast cancer recurrence prediction using its circulating tumor cell platform.

In PLOS this week: deletion in NME5 linked to primary ciliary dyskinesia in Alaskan Malamutes, study of rabies virus movement in Ontario, and more.

The partners will use Biolidics' circulating tumor cell retrieval system to evaluate the cells' utility as biomarkers of patient response to cancer treatment.

An environmental DNA analysis of Loch Ness uncovered more eel DNA than expected, the Guardian reports.

Just Like The Old Cat

Agence France-Presse reports that the Chinese firm Sinogene has successfully cloned a pet cat.

By sequencing an Indus Valley Civilization representative and related individuals, investigators learned more about the South Asian ancestry, farming history, and languages.

The Belgian oncology molecular diagnostics firm reported a 17 percent increase in product sales but said that sales of cartridges in the US were lower than expected. 

Based on runs of homozygosity, researchers estimated that roughly one in every 3,650 participants had parents who were first- or second-degree relatives.

The company hopes to develop AI-based tools to improve the usefulness of its ESCAPE platform, which combines single-cell sequencing with protein analysis.

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In PLOS this week: Mycobacterium abscessus linked to gastric conditions, placental gene expression changes associated with preterm birth, and more.

The Guardian reports that UK universities are looking into ways to reduce labs' reliance on single-use plastics.

People with certain gene variants tend to not like vegetables, particularly bitter ones, CNN reports.

MIT's Technology Review reports on a company's genetic test that gauges an embryo's susceptibility to certain diseases.