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Asia/Oceania

"Doing Fine"

In a Twitter thread, Technology Review's Antonio Regalado says that He Jiankui is "doing fine" and that concerns about possible penalties are misplaced.

A busy second day of the JP Morgan conference saw Thermo Fisher's Marc Casper discuss the firm's R&D focus and Exact Sciences' Kevin Conroy discuss plans for Cologuard sales growth.

The Telegraph reports there are concerns He Jiankui, who announced the birth gene-edited embryos, might face the death penalty.

In PNAS this week: sequencing analysis of Brooklyn measles cases, conserved neural transcriptional features that coincide with monogamy, and more.

Among the firms presenting, 10x noted that it doubled its revenue growth in 2018, and Myriad discussed the impact that new tests are having on its growth.

Japan's Nichirei will register Biocartis' Idylla MDx oncology products with the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare.

In PLOS this week: links between placental transcriptome and weight; colorectal cancer-related microRNAs; and more.

Paragon and MGI Tech — a unit of BGI — have signed a distribution deal for certain of their respective next-generation sequencing panels and sample prep products.

A brief recap of Genetics/Genomics news the week of Jan 4, 2019: Pacific Biosciences, Promega, Natera, OrigiMed, GeneNews, Fulgen Genetics, and Tubingen

PGDx and KingMed plan to provide tumor mutational burden testing to pharmaceutical companies for clinical trials in China and Hong Kong.

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NPR reports that the patient who underwent a CRISPR-based treatment for sickle cell disease is doing well.

Resistance to ash dieback disease among some UK ash trees appears polygenic, the Independent reports.

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: sequencing strategy for flash-frozen brain tissue bank samples, new version of ChlamDB, and more.

A UK woman is suing three National Health Service Trusts for not telling her about her father's Huntington's disease diagnosis, the BBC reports.