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Asia/Oceania

Maybe Not to Eat…

Mainichi reports that 43 percent of Japanese individuals said they did not want to eat agricultural products that had been modified using gene-editing tools.

Last year, the firm saw 21 percent growth in reproductive health, 56 percent growth in oncology, and 49 percent growth in infectious disease testing.

The companies signed an agreement earlier this year to jointly develop microbiome research services for international markets including a shotgun metagenomic sequencing-based service.

The Singapore-based firm plans to use its single-cell RNA and protein assay to help optimize the production of CAR T cells and guide their use in patients.

The researchers were able to engineer variants of the base editors that reduced the off-target RNA SNVs while maintaining their on-target DNA editing.

A few key loci appear to contribute to a lasting immune response following childhood immunizations against meningococcal bacteria, tetanus, or Haemophilus influenzae type B.

In PNAS this week: diversity and spread of Yersinia pestis, local adaptations in switchgrass, and more.

Stronger Rules

China's State Council is strengthening regulations regarding scientific studies that rely on genetic or other material from Chinese individuals, according to Reuters.

Biotage will provide systems and consumables from its analytical chemistry portfolio to be sold by Yingsheng under its own brand.

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The nonprofit Biden Cancer Initiative is suspending its operations, according to the Associated Press.

Researchers examine how white nationalists handle personal genetic ancestry results that conflict with their racist worldview, the New York Times reports.

NPR speaks with research participants before and after they learn their APOE E4 status, which affects their risk of developing Alzheimer's disease.

In PLOS this week: genetic characterization of Toxoplasma gondii strains, Crimean-Congo Hemorrhagic Fever Virus uncovered in Sudan, and more.