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Asia/Oceania

Chinese state news agency Xinhua reports that a preliminary investigation has found He Jiankui performed his gene-editing work illegally.

In PNAS this week: chromosomal features of maize, adaptations in the vinous-throated parrotbill, and more.

The firm's has expanded its ctDNA sequencing test to cover 17 genes, enough to provide a readout of microsatellite instability for guiding cancer immunotherapy use.

In Science this week: reduction in bee phylogenetic diversity, and more.

A brief recap of Genetics/Genomics news the week of Jan 18, 2019: Fitbit, Cancer Genetics, Precipio and MakatiMed, Interpace Dignostics, and the World Health Organization.

Qiagen's test detects the most frequently occurring somatic mutations in EGFR in less than four hours using real-time PCR on the Rotor-Gene Q platform.

Within the country's first whole-genome sequencing program, researchers hope to initially focus on identifying markers associated with hereditary diseases and cancer risk.

In Nucleic Acids Research this week: new accurate quantification by sequencing approach, CNV breakpoints in Plasmodium falciparum, and more.

A Chinese research team examined why cancer cell populations that amass deleterious mutations do not undergo population extinction.

CNN reports that people's genes tend to have a greater influence on their risk of developing disease than their environment, but it varies by phenotype.

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates more people get sick and die from drug-resistant germs than previously thought, the Washington Post reports.

According to the Associated Press, three universities and a healthcare institution are sharing a gift of $1 billion.

New rules seek to limit the type of scientific and medical research that can be used to guide public health regulations, the New York Times reports.

In Nature this week: FreeHi-C approach simulates Hi-C data from interacting genome fragments, and more.