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Asia/Oceania

The Wall Street Journal reports there is uncertainty surrounding whether He Jiankui's embryo editing did what he said it did.

In Nature this week: genomic analysis of the invasive fall webworm, amp of constrained coding regions within the human genome, and more.

Using data for nearly 45,000 epilepsy cases and controls, researchers identified loci contributing to focal epilepsy, genetic generalized epilepsy, or unclassified epilepsy.

Publication of He Jiankui's work on gene-edited infants would raise ethical concerns for journals, Wired and others report.

In PNAS this week: skin pigmentation evolution among KhoeSan, biomarkers for dengue virus progression, and more.

Research continues to show that it is possible to detect genetic signs of cancer in a blood sample without the need to measure specific oncogenic mutations.

As they dig into the data on He Jiankui's genome editing experiment, CRISPR researchers say the work he did raises many scientific questions.

The firm's assay measures the concentration of the wild type and mutant alleles of hFE protein at three different mutation sites from a person's blood sample.

No Gene Drive Ban

Vox reports that the United Nations' Convention on Biological Diversity decided against a gene drive moratorium.

In Nature this week: genome sequences of two giant tortoises, genome assemblies and annotations for two allotetraploid cotton species, and more.

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The Wall Street Journal looks into FamilyTreeDNA's handling of genetic genealogy searches by law enforcement.

In a point-counterpoint in the Boston Globe, researchers discuss the potential of gene editing to prevent Lyme disease, but also the pitfalls of doing so.

MIT's Technology Review reports that researchers hope to develop a CRISPR-based pain therapy.

In Science this week: atlas of malaria parasites' gene expression across their life cycles, and more.