ARRA | GenomeWeb

ARRA

"FDA houses the largest known repository of clinical data — unique, high-quality data on the safety, effectiveness and performance of drugs, biologics and devices, both before and after approval," the agency said in its priorities report. "Despite the availability of these data, questions about subpopulation responses and underlying placebo effects remain unanswered."

The company aims to show that its web-based, customer-reported data-gathering model yields results comparable to traditional research methods — both in terms of the accuracy of phenotypic data reported by customers, as well as the overall ability of the approach to replicate known associations between genes and drug response.

According to Woodcock, comparative effectiveness research and personalized medicine can come together in conducting community-based research. But for that, the US research infrastructure needs to be improved.

While the majority of the new funding will support genome-wide association studies, also benefiting from the federal stimulus package are research projects focused on copy number-variation analysis, gene expression, and bioinformatics.

The 970 grants awarded to 'omics projects comprise 7.5 percent of the NIH stimulus grants awarded so far, but the total funding awarded to these projects makes up 14 percent of NIH ARRA grant funding to date.

According to the grant abstracts, the project is "an unprecedented partnership" between two large-scale sequencing centers — at Baylor College of Medicine and at the Broad Institute — and a network of research labs focused on the genetics of autism, brought together by the Autism Genome Project and the Autism Consortium.

The funding will support a new ABI Qtrap and genetics and genomics studies of disease and organ growth.

Biomedical research projects are generating a ton of data that still needs to be analyzed, NPR reports.

Theranos is retiring some of its board members, including Henry Kissinger and George Shultz, Business Insider reports.

The heads of 29 scientific societies and some 2,300 researchers call on President-elect Donald Trump to rely on and support science in two separate letters.

In Science this week: genetically modified flu virus could be key to new live vaccines, and more.