Transgenomic Licenses Liquid Biopsy Tech to University of Melbourne

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Transgenomic announced today that it has granted a license to the University of Melbourne to use its multiplexed ICE-COLD PCR (MX-ICP) technology for certain research and clinical applications.

The deal, which follows a collaboration between the parties to clinically validate the DNA amplification technology, specifically provides the university with an exclusive license to Transgenomic's MX-ICP-enabled EGFR liquid biopsy cancer assays in Australia.

According to the company, the four tests detect specific actionable mutations associated with sensitivity or resistance to targeted drugs used for colorectal and non-small cell lung cancer in sample types including plasma. They will be available for both research use and diagnostic applications through the university's National Association of Testing Authorities certified laboratory.

Transgenomic will sell the tests to the University of Melbourne and will also receive royalties. The partners have also agreed to jointly provide biomarker identification services to biopharmaceutical companies.

"The agreement has the added benefit of providing us with the opportunity for additional validation of our MX-ICP technology and our new liquid biopsy diagnostic assays in partnership with a top-tier cancer institution," Transgenomic President and CEO Paul Kinnon said in a statement. "This is the first of what we expect to be many licenses worldwide for our MX-ICP technology."

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