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Syngenta Licenses Broad Institute CRISPR IP

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Syngenta announced today that it has obtained a non-exclusive license from the Broad Institute to intellectual property covering the genome-editing technology CRISPR-Cas9 for agricultural applications.

Specific terms of the deal were not disclosed.

"Gaining access to CRISPR-Cas9 technology will allow us to accelerate the rate of innovation in the development of new plant varieties, and bring novel traits into the hands of growers faster and with greater efficiency," Michiel van Lookeren Campagne, global head of seeds research at Syngenta, said in a statement.

Syngenta said that it is using CRISPR-Cas9 in multiple crops including corn, wheat, tomato, rice, and sunflower.

Earlier this year, the Broad non-exclusively licensed its CRISPR-Cas9 IP to BASF for ag-bio and industrial applications. And last month, the institute partnered with DuPont Pioneer to jointly provide non-exclusive licenses to their respective CRISPR-Cas9 IP estates for commercial agricultural research and product development purposes.

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