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Seven Bridges, ZS Partner for Multiomics Analytics in Drug Development

This article has been updated to correct the name and headquarters location of ZS.

NEW YORK – Seven Bridges Genomics said this week that it is partnering with biomedical research services firm ZS to provide scalable multiomics analytics for drug development.

Seven Bridges Chief Revenue Officer Bruce Press said that his company will be integrating its core multiomics analysis platform as well as its Aria technology for analyzing genotypic and phenotypic data for drug discovery with ZS's store of research data to help the latter company better serve its pharmaceutical customers.

Boston-based Seven Bridges said in a statement that this combination will provide a "one-stop solution for innovation and scalability." ZS, of Evanston, Illinois, has built up a large data warehouse over the last several years.

"Working side by side with our clients to help streamline R&D data and increase speed to market to improve patients' lives is at the core of what we do," ZS research and development leader Aaron Mitchell said in a statement. "Our partnership with Seven Bridges provides our clients, and ultimately patients, a faster path to new treatments and diagnostics."

John Piccone, who heads the biomedical research service line for ZS, said genomic and molecular-level analysis are essential for drug discovery, translational medicine, and preclinical drug development today.

"Our partnership with Seven Bridges gives our clients a new option for innovation and scalable capacity," Piccone said. "The combination of Seven Bridges platform and experts with ZS consulting teams provides a scalable solution for clients with growing multiomics data and analytics needs."  

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