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NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Breaking into markets for nucleic acid testing is not an easy proposition for any startup, but Electronucleics, a company recently founded by University of California, Los Angeles researchers, believes that a device it is developing could satisfy unmet needs for use of an inexpensive, fast, and high-sensitivity device at the point of care.

The nucleic acid diagnostic test they are developing doesn't require complex amplification or expensive optics and, according to the researchers, it could be available as a manufacturing prototype in about a year.

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