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Kromatid Receives $2M Investment From BroadOak Capital Partners

NEW YORK – Kromatid said on Wednesday that it has received a $2 million investment from BroadOak Capital Partners.

The Longmont, Colorado-based firm said it will use the funding to accelerate the commercialization of its recently launched directional genomic hybridization, or dGH, In-Site and dGH SCREEN products for gene editing and gene therapy applications. The company also plans to use some of the funds for ongoing product development, and to increase production capacity.

The dGH platform provides single cell, genome-wide analysis of genomic structural data to optimize gene editing for research and clinical purposes, such as therapeutic gene editing based on CRISPR technologies.

The unidirectional In-Site probes use dGH technology to provide whole-genome tracking of inserted DNA cassettes as small as 2 kb, as well as a single-cell, genome-wide perspective of cellular engineering outcomes, including tracking of viral and non-viral mediated insert integration. The dGH SCREEN, which stands for Single-Cell Rearrangement Event Evaluation and Numbering, is a single-cell assay designed to monitor structural variants throughout the genome and provides comprehensive and high-resolution karyographic analysis, according to Kromatid's website.

"We are delighted to have BroadOak's support and access to their expertise in the biopharma markets," Kromatid CEO Christopher Tompkins said in a statement. "With this non-dilutive funding, we are able to expand our current services to biopharma, providing essential structural context to genomic manipulations associated with the development of breakthrough gene therapies. BroadOak's financing further enables the launch of our suite of whole-genome, single cell genomic analysis products."

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