Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

Human Longevity Acquires Cypher Genomics

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Human Longevity said today that it has acquired genome informatics firm Cypher Genomics for an undisclosed amount.

San Diego-based Cypher Genomics has been offering human genome interpretation software. The company's 14 employees will join Human Longevity, including CEO and cofounder Ashley Van Zeeland, who is now heading Human Longevity's pediatric business.

Cypher's Mantis software is used to interpret genomic sequencing data to find clinically significant variants. In addition, the company has developed a biomarker discovery service called Coral.

Cypher's collaborators include Celgene, Illumina, Sequenom, the Scripps Translational Science Institute, the University of Pennsylvania, and the Clinic for Special Children. This past summer, the company and its partner Lockheed Martin were selected by Genomics England as a reserve bidder for providing genome interpretations for the 100,000 Genomes Project.

"Cypher Genomics has created important automated and scalable genome interpretation technology, informed by additional expertise in genetics and biology, that we believe will be invaluable to [Human Longevity's] business," said Human Longevity CEO and cofounder Craig Venter in a statement.

The Scan

Germline-Targeting HIV Vaccine Shows Promise in Phase I Trial

A National Institutes of Health-led team reports in Science that a broadly neutralizing antibody HIV vaccine induced bnAb precursors in 97 percent of those given the vaccine.

Study Uncovers Genetic Mutation in Childhood Glaucoma

A study in the Journal of Clinical Investigation ties a heterozygous missense variant in thrombospondin 1 to childhood glaucoma.

Gene Co-Expression Database for Humans, Model Organisms Gets Update

GeneFriends has been updated to include gene and transcript co-expression networks based on RNA-seq data from 46,475 human and 34,322 mouse samples, a new paper in Nucleic Acids Research says.

New Study Investigates Genomics of Fanconi Anemia Repair Pathway in Cancer

A Rockefeller University team reports in Nature that FA repair deficiency leads to structural variants that can contribute to genomic instability.