Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

ERS Genomics Licenses CRISPR Patents to CRO ZeClinics

NEW YORK – ERS Genomics said on Tuesday that it has granted contract research organization ZeClinics a non-exclusive license to its CRISPR-Cas9 patent portfolio, which ZeClinics will use to create single-knockout, double-knockout, and somatic F0 knockout zebrafish variants for use as disease models.

Financial and other terms of the deal were not disclosed.

Dublin-based ERS Genomics was founded to provide access to CRISPR-Cas9 intellectual property held by Emmanuelle Charpentier. The IP is shared between her, Jennifer Doudna and the University of California, and the University of Vienna and is separate from genome editing patents held by the Broad Institute.

ZeClinics supports academic, pharmaceutical, and biotech organizations in preclinical studies by providing services based on its zebrafish disease models, in particular services to analyze the safety, efficacy, and biomedical relevance of new compounds.

"The zebrafish model is a powerful tool for answering complex questions. The use of CRISPR tools to modify zebrafish models allows us to streamline functional genomic processes and provide insights into biologically relevant knowledge on diseases," ZeClinics Cofounder and CEO Simone Calzolari said in a statement.

"By providing them access to this foundational CRISPR-Cas9 intellectual property, ZeClinics is able to continue to provide valuable preclinical models and services for drug discovery and development," ERS CEO Eric Rhodes added.

ERS has signed dozens of similar non-exclusive licensing agreements with various companies for its CRISPR patent portfolio. In December, for example, the firm granted a license to German startup company Vivlion, which will use it to improve its own gene editing reagents and screening services.

The Scan

Cell Atlas of Human Lung Development Gives View of Developing Airway

Researchers have generated a cell atlas of human lung development, which they report in Cell.

Study Finds Costs of Genome Sequencing May Limit Utility in Routine Care

Researchers report in the European Journal of Human Genetics that genome sequencing for rare disease diagnoses currently has similar benefits as less expensive exome analysis.

Study Suggests Nursing Mother's Diet Can Impact Offspring's Gut Microbiome

A new Cell Host and Microbe paper finds that mice whose mothers were fed a low-fiber diet during nursing experience lasting microbiota dysbiosis and increased obesity.

Study Links Genetic Risk for ADHD With Alzheimer's Disease

A higher polygenic risk score for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder is also linked to cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease, a new study in Molecular Psychiatry finds.