Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

DNA Script, Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry Ink Licensing Deal

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – DNA Script announced today that it has acquired an exclusive license from Dynamic Combinatorial Chemistry (DCC) to a novel DNA building block for use in enzymatic DNA synthesis.

The building blocks, which were initially developed by DCC affiliate Firebird Biomolecular Sciences, are reversible terminator nucleotides with cleavable protective groups that help in controlling the enzymatic synthesis process, according to DNA Script COO Sylvain Gariel.

"Modified DNA building blocks in this technology transfer were initially created for enzyme-based DNA sequencing, mutation detection, and DNA tagging and processing," DCC CEO Steven Benner, who invented the technology, said in a statement. "However, the modifications can be compatible with enzyme-based DNA synthesis — exactly the business that DNA Script leads."

Specific terms of the deal were not disclosed. However, DNA Script said that the agreement may be expanded to include the commercialization of new DCC technologies developed with National Institutes of Health funding.

In September, Paris-based DNA Script closed an €11 million Series A financing round led by Illumina Ventures.


The Scan

Study Links Evolution of Longevity, Social Organization in Mammals

With the help of comparative phylogenetics and transcriptomics, researchers in Nature Communications see ties between lifespan and social organization in mammals.

Tumor Microenvironment Immune Score Provides Immunotherapy Response, Prognostic Insights

Using multiple in situ analyses and RNA sequence data, researchers in eBioMedicine have developed a score associated with immunotherapy response or survival.

CRISPR-Based Method for Finding Cancer-Associated Exosomal MicroRNAs in Blood

A team from China presents in ACS Sensors a liposome-mediated membrane fusion strategy for detecting miRNAs carried in exosomes in the blood with a CRISPR-mediated reporter system.

Drug Response Variants May Be Distinct in Somatic, Germline Samples

Based on variants from across 21 drug response genes, researchers in The Pharmacogenomics Journal suspect that tumor-only DNA sequences may miss drug response clues found in the germline.