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Consumer Genomics Firm Helix Inks Partnerships With Good Start Genetics, Duke University

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Newly minted consumer genomics firm Helix said today that it has entered into product development collaborations with two new partners.

Good Start Genetics is collaborating with Helix to develop consumer applications to help couples better understand their reproductive health.

"As DNA information becomes more widely accessible, we will offer suites of products for healthcare providers and consumers throughout the reproductive journey," Good Start Genetics CEO Don Hardison said in a statement. "Our relationship with Helix broadens our footprint in the digital environment for best-in-class products for consumers."

Meantime, Duke University is collaborating with Helix to develop novel educational programs focused on genetics, and to support entrepreneurs who build on the Helix platform.

"We are excited about the opportunity to develop a suite of innovative tools that will allow students, faculty, and the public to learn how to use their genomes for a myriad of insights into their health, well-being, and families," Geoff Ginsburg, director at the Center for Applied Genomics and Precision Medicine at Duke University, noted in a statement.

Helix was formed in August by Illumina, Warburg Pincus, and Sutter Hill Ventures, and with financing commitments of more than $100 million. The San Francisco-based firm aims to provide affordable sequencing and database services for consumer samples obtained through its partners.

The firm previously announced partnerships with the Center for Individualized Medicine at Mayo Clinic, which will develop applications initially focused on consumer education and health-related queries; and Laboratory Corporation of America, which will develop and offer analysis and interpretation services, initially focused on medically actionable genetic conditions.

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