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Celemics, Strand Life Sciences Partner on Integrated Platform for NGS Analysis

NEW YORK – Celemics, a Korean manufacturer of targeted capture kits for next-generation sequencing, is combining its bioinformatics pipeline with analytics technology from Strand Life Sciences to help researchers go from sample to report using a single technology platform.

Under terms of the partnership, Bengaluru, India-based Strand Life Sciences will integrate the Celemics pipeline into its StrandOmics tertiary analysis platform. This integrated offering will include assay-specific variant filters to provide "guaranteed" clinical-grade data compliance for researchers in cancer and rare diseases, according to the companies.

"With our … track record of running NGS labs as well as interpretation support for genetic tests, we are excited to partner with Celemics to help bring their cancer, inherited cancer, and rare disease panels to the market," Strand Life Sciences CEO Ramesh Hariharan said in a statement.

"[Strand's] expertise in the engineering of NGS systems and long track record with the instrument and diagnostic companies will be valuable in accelerating our path to market integration," added Hyoki Kim, cofounder and CEO of Seoul, South Korea-based Celemics.

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