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Accelerate Diagnostics' 2014 Revenues Rise Sharply

NEW YORK (GenomeWeb) – Accelerate Diagnostics said on Thursday that its total revenues shot up to $122,000 in 2014 from $48,000 in 2013. 

In its Form 10-K filed with the US Securities and Exchange Commission, the company said that the increase resulted from deferred royalties recognized last year. In 2014 Accelerate recognized $69,000 in deferred revenues compared to $10,000 in 2013. 

All revenues for both years consisted of licensing and royalty revenues. 

The Tucson, Ariz.-based firm, which is developing a clinical microbiological detection platform, recorded a net loss of $30.1 million in 2014, compared to a net loss of $15.3 million in 2013. 

The company's R&D spending nearly doubled year over year to $20.1 million last year from $10.7 million, while its SG&A costs more than doubled to $10.7 million from $4.3 million. 

Accelerate said in its SEC document that its R&D costs were up as a result of a larger workforce, increased non-cash equity-based compensation costs of $2.7 million, and increased instrument purchases, as well as costs related to prelaunch efforts. 

Last month, company CEO Larry Mehren told investors that Accelerate plans to launch its platform in Europe some time this year and to start clinical trials in preparation of a 510(k) submission to the US Food and Drug Administration. The instrument leverages the firm's proprietary technology for single-cell microbiology analysis. The method ­– formerly called BACcel – is a culture-free process for both genomic and phenotypic detection.

Meanwhile, the company's year over year increase in SG&A costs was driven by salaries and related expenses as it ramps up operations. The 2014 figure also includes a non-cash equity-based compensation expense of $3.1 million, Accelerate said. 

The company finished 2014 with $53.6 million in cash and cash equivalents. 

In afternoon trading on the Nasdaq, shares of Accelerate were down nearly 4 percent to $19.52.

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