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Woolly mammoths

A mammoth from Wrangel Island that was alive close to the time the species went extinct showed signs of genomic deterioration compared with an older mammoth.

A comparison of single-cell RNA sequencing profiles from more than 1,000 fresh or frozen samples suggests cryopreservation does not alter general transcriptome patterns.

VA patients will now have access to Polymedco's colorectal cancer screening products, including the Epigenomics Epi proColon.

Tempus will provide sequencing and analysis for glioblastoma patients in a clinical trial at Duke using engineered poliovirus as a treatment.

The agreement provides coverage for more than 6 million people in Michigan and the larger Great Lakes region for the company's proteomic ovarian cancer test.

A decline in collaboration revenues more than offset revenue gains for the company's Idylla platform and test cartridges.

The firm touted recent Blues coverage decisions for the Afirma thyroid cancer test, and final Medicare coverage policies for the Percepta lung cancer test.

The company saw growth in almost all parts of its revenue stream, except instruments, including a 69 percent increase in revenue from collaborations.

The GenomeWeb Index rose nearly 5 percent in February, on par with the Dow and slightly outperforming the Nasdaq.

The FANTOM consortium generated an atlas of nearly 30,000 human long non-coding RNAs that suggests more than 19,000 of them are functional.

Samples from metastatic melanoma patients treated sequentially with immunotherapies targeting CTLA4 and PD-1 pointed to response-related tumor features.

The company attributed the decline to lower revenues from its collaboration with Quest Diagnostics.

Under the terms of the deal, HDB will have access to Luxcel's assays and technologies for mitochondrial function, metabolism, and toxicity.

Grail plans to raise a total of more than $1 billion before the end of the first quarter.

The Palo Alto-based firm plans to use the money to further validate its non-invasive, early cancer detection technology.

CEO Hany Massarany said that 2017 will be a pivotal year for the company as it expects to launch the ePlex sample-to-answer system in the US.

The study will involve assaying proteomic markers for dementias including Alzheimer's disease, and understanding genomic markers as part of the normal aging process.

The prototype system uses viral genome data to act as a framework for real-time molecular epidemiology and evolutionary analysis of emerging epidemics.

Biosys Technologies, Tokyo University, and St. Marianna University will use the firm's mass spec-based technology for drug screening.

GenePeeks will provide its Virtual Progeny Analytics approach, which includes scores that predict gene function and associated disease risk in hypothetical babies.

The funding will help the company accelerate the commercialization of its proprietary genome-editing technology.

The firm's full-year loss per share was unchanged from the prior year, but its Q4 loss dropped about 9 percent to $3.1 million compared to the year-ago quarter.

The system allows oncologists to pick treatment regimens using NantHealth's decision support tool, and order them directly through Allscript's EHR system.

Researchers identified and started analyzing thousands of non-repetitive, non-human reference genome sequences in individuals from Iceland.

A pair of papers has linked mutations in the DCC gene to agenesis of the corpus callosum as well as to a new syndrome.

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Startup companies are taking on personalized medicine, CNET reports.

Bruce Booth writes at Life Sci VC that biotech clusters like Boston and San Francisco are getting even more consolidated.

The Verge speaks with Mark and Scott Kelly, who are the subjects of NASA's Twin Study.

In Genome Biology this week: genes linked to Hirschsprung disease, structural variant patterns in autism, and more.