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Yup, That's Them

Ohio State's Carlo Croce takes center stage in this Smithsonian Magazine article that also tells the story of how microRNAs were uncovered. In the early 1990s, Croce had been looking for a gene for chronic lymphocytic leukemia, but didn't come up with anything. Then, though, Victor Ambros and Gary Ruvkun were studying different C. elegans mutants in which they found those mutations were in genes that coded for microRNAs. Croce and one member of his lab, George Calin, then took another look for the CLL gene: "Croce looked at Calin and blinked. 'S---!,' Calin recalls him saying. 'These are the genes!'" the article says.

The Scan

UCLA Team Reports Cost-Effective Liquid Biopsy Approach for Cancer Detection

The researchers report in Nature Communications that their liquid biopsy approach has high specificity in detecting all- and early-stage cancers.

Machine Learning Improves Diagnostic Accuracy of Breast Cancer MRI, Study Shows

Combining machine learning with radiologists' interpretations further increased the diagnostic accuracy of MRIs for breast cancer, a Science Translational Medicine paper finds.

Genome Damage in Neurons Triggers Alzheimer's-Linked Inflammation

Neurons harboring increased DNA double-strand breaks activate microglia to lead to neuroinflammation like that seen in Alzheimer's disease, a new Science Advances study finds.

Long COVID-19 Susceptibility Clues Contained in Blood Plasma Proteome

A longitudinal study in eBioMedicine found weeks-long blood plasma proteome shifts after SARS-CoV-2 infection, along with proteomic signatures that appeared to coincide with long Covid risk.