An article in Wired reports on advances in scientists' genetic understanding of Osedax, a recently discovered family of "mouthless worms that live in the bones of dead whales." A study published this week in BMC Biology led by Robert Vrijenhoek from the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute scanned genes from several species of the worms and indicates that there may be "at least 12 more as-yet-unidentified lineages of Osedax," which appear to have had a common ancestor 45 million yea

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York University researchers find genomic evidence of inbreeding in the yellow-banded bumblebee, according to Reuters.

In its survey of US adults, the Pew Research Center finds that views on the genetic engineering of animals depend on why it's done.

The Scientist reports agricultural researchers are working on a gene-stacking tool.

In Nature this week: statistical method for overcoming case-control imbalance issues, and more.