The World Inside

As part of an effort to understand how microbes affect human health, the Guardian's Andrew Anthony sent off a fecal microbiome sample to be analyzed by Paul O'Toole at the BioSciences Institute in Cork, Ireland.

Anthony writes that his microbiome appears fairly healthy — mostly firmicutes and bacteroidetes on the phylum level, but also including roseburia, which produce butyrate, and lachnospira, but fewer bacteroides and alistipes than usual.

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