Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

Or in 'Team'

"There is no 'I' in research," says Benchfly's Alan Marnett. Researchers have become more and more inclined to collaborate with each other, and although speed is certainly one reason to collaborate, it's not the only one. "If we can understand what drives collaboration, it may be possible to help support and enable more of them in the future," Marnett says. In a Benchfly poll on collaboration, 75 percent of respondents said they work with others "to gain access to technical expertise," while 60 percent said they do it to complete the work faster, and 45 percent to increase "brainstorming" or "hypothesis generation" on a given project.

Daily Scan wants to know: what reasons do you have for collaborating with others?

The Scan

Alzheimer's Risk Gene Among Women

CNN reports that researchers have found that variants in MGMT contribute to Alzheimer's disease risk among women but not men.

Still Hanging Around

The Guardian writes that persistent pockets of SARS-CoV-2 in the body could contribute to long COVID.

Through a Little Spit

Enteric viruses like norovirus may also be transmitted through saliva, not just the fecal-oral route, according to New Scientist.

Nature Papers Present Method to Detect Full Transcriptome, Viruses Infecting Asgard Archaea, More

In Nature this week: VASA-seq approach to detect full transcriptome, analysis of viruses infecting Asgard archaea, and more.