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Winners in Medicine

Elizabeth Blackburn, Carol Greider, and Jack Szostak won the 2009 Nobel Prize in medicine for their work on telomeres, reports the Associated Press. In the 1970s, Blackburn identified repeating segments at the ends of DNA in Tetrahymena while Szostak found that single-stranded DNA was rapidly degraded in yeast. Blackburn and Szostak then collaborated on a project, finding that the Tetrahymena DNA protected the single-stranded DNA from degradation in yeast. In 1984, Blackburn and Greider, her graduate student, discovered telomerase. The Nobel citation lauds these researchers for their contribution to the study of aging, cancer, and other diseases. "The discoveries by Blackburn, Greider and Szostak have added a new dimension to our understanding of the cell, shed light on disease mechanisms, and stimulated the development of potential new therapies," it says.

Blackburn was also the Daily Scan poll favorite. She led the pack with 43 percent of the vote. She was followed by her co-laureate Szostak who garnered 25 percent of the vote.

The Scan

Fertility Fraud Found

Consumer genetic testing has uncovered cases of fertility fraud that are leading to lawsuits, according to USA Today.

Ties Between Vigorous Exercise, ALS in Genetically At-Risk People

Regular strenuous exercise could contribute to motor neuron disease development among those already at genetic risk, Sky News reports.

Test Warning

The Guardian writes that the US regulators have warned against using a rapid COVID-19 test that is a key part of mass testing in the UK.

Science Papers Examine Feedback Mechanism Affecting Xist, Continuous Health Monitoring for Precision Medicine

In Science this week: analysis of cis confinement of the X-inactive specific transcript, and more.