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William Lipscomb Dies

William Lipscomb, who won the 1976 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, has died. He was 91. Lipscomb won the Nobel for his work using an X-ray diffraction approach to study the chemical bonding between boron and hydrogen, The New York Times reports. Lipscomb, the Times adds, was a protégé of two-time Nobel Prize winner Linus Pauling. Lipscomb is also remembered for his sense of humor as he took part in many Ig Nobel Prize ceremonies and even once noted in a paper that his group "made this observation with the benefit of hindsight. This science is known as retrospectroscopy."

The Scan

Not Kept "Clean and Sanitary"

A Food and Drug Administration inspection uncovered problems with cross contamination at an Emergent BioSolutions facility, the Wall Street Journal reports.

Resumption Recommendation Expected

The Washington Post reports that US officials are expected to give the go-ahead to resume using Johnson & Johnson's SARS-CoV-2 vaccine.

Canada's New Budget on Science

Science writes that Canada's new budget includes funding for the life sciences, but not as much as hoped for investigator-driven research.

Nature Papers Examine Single-Cell, Multi-Omic SARS-CoV-2 Response; Flatfish Sequences; More

In Nature this week: single-cell, multi-omics analysis provides insight into COVID-19 pathogenesis, evolution of flatfish, and more.