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William Lipscomb Dies

William Lipscomb, who won the 1976 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, has died. He was 91. Lipscomb won the Nobel for his work using an X-ray diffraction approach to study the chemical bonding between boron and hydrogen, The New York Times reports. Lipscomb, the Times adds, was a protégé of two-time Nobel Prize winner Linus Pauling. Lipscomb is also remembered for his sense of humor as he took part in many Ig Nobel Prize ceremonies and even once noted in a paper that his group "made this observation with the benefit of hindsight. This science is known as retrospectroscopy."

The Scan

Highly Similar

Researchers have uncovered bat viruses that are highly similar to SARS-CoV-2, according to Nature News.

Gain of Oversight

According to the Wall Street Journal, the Biden Administration is considering greater oversight of gain-of-function research.

Lasker for mRNA Vaccine Work

The Scientist reports that researchers whose work enabled the development of mRNA-based vaccines are among this year's Lasker Award winners

PLOS Papers on Causal Variant Mapping, Ancient Salmonella, ALK Fusion Test for NSCLC

In PLOS this week: MsCAVIAR approach to map causal variants, analysis of ancient Salmonella, and more.