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Who Says Scientists Don't Have Rhythm?

Hey, you look like you're in need of some good procrastination material. Fortunately we have plenty of DNA song videos to keep you from any real work you might've gotten done today.

First up: "Regulatin' Genes," in which Derrick Davis and Tom McFadden from Stanford parody a Jay-Z song to offer some tips on gene regulation and cell specialization. Truly worth two and a half minutes of your time.

Next, Andre posts a video at Biocurious -- this one's called "The Nano Song" and, yes, it's a nanotechnology lesson for puppets.

Finally, David Dooling at PolITiGenomics links out to DNA Rainbow, which evidently has converted the human reference sequence into audio. "You can listen to a the entire human genome reference sequence, base by base, if you have 23 years to kill," Dooling writes.

The Scan

Myotonic Dystrophy Repeat Detected in Family Genome Sequencing Analysis

While sequencing individuals from a multi-generation family, researchers identified a myotonic dystrophy type 2-related short tandem repeat in the European Journal of Human Genetics.

TB Resistance Insights Gleaned From Genome Sequence, Antimicrobial Response Assays

Researchers in PLOS Biology explore M. tuberculosis resistance with a combination of sequencing and assays looking at the minimum inhibitory concentrations of 13 drugs.

Mendelian Disease Genes Prioritized Using Tissue-Specific Expression Clues

Mendelian gene candidates could be flagged for further functional analyses based on tissue-specific transcriptome and proteome profiles, a new Journal of Human Genetics paper says.

Single-Cell Sequencing Points to Embryo Mosaicism

Mosaicism may affect preimplantation genetic tests for aneuploidy, a single-cell sequencing-based analysis of almost three dozen embryos in PLOS Genetics finds.