This Week in PNAS

Investigators at Duke University report in a PNAS paper published online in advance this week on their use of human artificial chromosome assembly assays, with which they show that "both D17Z1 and D17Z1-B can support de novo centromere assembly independently." This study, the authors say, illustrates the "presence of centromeric epialleles on an endogenous human chromosome" and points to the "genomic complexities underlying the mechanisms that determine centromere identity in h

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A phylogenetic analysis indicates two venomous Australian spiders are more closely related than thought, the International Business Times reports.

Technology Review reports that 2017 was the year of consumer genetic testing and that it could spur new analysis companies.

In Science this week: CRISPR-based approach for recording cellular events, and more.

A new company says it will analyze customers' genes to find them a suitable date, though Smithsonian magazine says the science behind it might be shaky.