This Week in PLOS

A University of Manchester team has cast doubt on the notion that insects trapped in amber could help to resurrect extinct creatures — or even discern parts of their DNA sequence. As they report in PLOS One, the researchers attempted to sequence DNA from a decades old stingless bee sample and from another stingless bee sample more than 10,600 years old. Both had been entombed in copal, a precursor of amber.

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This Week in PLOS

This Week in PLOS

This Week in PLOS

This Week in PLOS

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This Week in PLOS

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