George Church and company have cooked up a scheme for harnessing components of the bacterial "clustered interspersed short palindromic repeat" and "CRISPR-associated" system — normally used in adaptive immunity — to aid in genome engineering efforts using the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. As they report in the online edition of Nucleic Acids Research, the researchers relied on RNA-guided endonuclease activity offered by components from the type II CRISPR-Cas system.

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