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This Week in Nature: Aug 9, 2012

In a paper published online in advance in Nature Methods this week, Anders Kristensen, Joerg Gsponer, and Leonard Foster from the University of British Columbia present a "high-throughput approach for measuring temporal changes in the interactome," which is based on a combination of quantitative proteomics and size-exclusion chromatography. The UBC trio also reports having applied its method to map 291 co-eluting complexes. "This method allows mapping of an interactome to the same depth and accuracy as AP-MS with less work and without overexpression or tagging," Kristensen et al. write. "The use of triplex labeling enables monitoring of interactome rearrangements."

Over in Nature Genetics, an international team led by investigators at the University of Melbourne presents its whole-genome sequencing-based investigation of 132 globally distributed Shigella sonnei isolates. "Our phylogenetic analysis shows that the current S. sonnei population descends from a common ancestor that existed less than 500 years ago and that diversified into several distinct lineages with unique characteristics," the team writes in a paper published online in advance this week. "Our analysis suggests that the majority of this diversification occurred in Europe and was followed by more recent establishment of local pathogen populations on other continents, predominantly due to the pandemic spread of a single, rapidly evolving, multidrug-resistant lineage."