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The Unthinkable

This story at The Scientist brings up a new worry: what happens to your data, should you die? After seeing a colleague and a student die, the University of Wisconsin's Karen Strier, says she worked with another primate researcher to store her data, collected over the lifespan of her muriqui monkeys, online. Secondly, the article asks, what happens to your equipment, your grants, and your employees? "I don't know if it has to rise to the level of having a standing plan or a living will for your lab," the University of Wisconsin's Brian Baldo tells The Scientist, "but it's always a good idea to make sure it's clear where copies of the data are kept, where important information is."

The Scan

NFTs for Genome Sharing

Nature News writes that non-fungible tokens could be a way for people to profit from sharing genomic data.

Wastewater Warning System

Time magazine writes that cities and college campuses are monitoring sewage for SARS-CoV-2, an approach officials hope lasts beyond COVID-19.

Networks to Boost Surveillance

Scientific American writes that new organizations and networks aim to improve the ability of developing countries to conduct SARS-CoV-2 genomic surveillance.

Genome Biology Papers on Gastric Cancer Epimutations, BUTTERFLY, GUNC Tool

In Genome Biology this week: recurrent epigenetic mutations in gastric cancer, correction tool for unique molecular identifier-based assays, and more.