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'Top 10'

It's hard to say which science and technology stories of 2011 were the most important or interesting, but Scientific American has taken a crack at identifying which stories made the biggest splash. "Some of our top choices could very well have an immediate effect on our lives. The impact of others may not be felt for years. Some discoveries may vanish altogether," Scientific American says. "We'll just have to see how things turn out in the years ahead. But no matter what, 2011 held big surprises in science and technology."

Among the stories the magazine's editors include are the victory of IBM's Watson on Jeopardy!, the resurgence of gene therapy in the treatment of several diseases, and the death of Steve Jobs. The entire list is here.

The Scan

Billions for Antivirals

The US is putting $3.2 billion toward a program to develop antivirals to treat COVID-19 in its early stages, the Wall Street Journal reports.

NFT of the Web

Tim Berners-Lee, who developed the World Wide Web, is auctioning its original source code as a non-fungible token, Reuters reports.

23andMe on the Nasdaq

23andMe's shares rose more than 20 percent following its merger with a special purpose acquisition company, as GenomeWeb has reported.

Science Papers Present GWAS of Brain Structure, System for Controlled Gene Transfer

In Science this week: genome-wide association study ties variants to white matter stricture in the brain, and more.