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That's a Lot of Ghosts Out There

A study done by Journal of the American Medical Association editors released yesterday, though not peer-reviewed or published, found that a "significant number" of medical journal papers are written by ghostwriters, according to the New York Times. The online survey of the authors from 630 papers found that 7.8 percent of them left people off the paper whose contributions qualified them to be authors. Furthermore, the New England Journal of Medicine had the high rate of ghostwriting at 10.9 percent and the rates at other journals are as follows: 7.9 percent in JAMA, 7.6 percent in The Lancet, 7.6 percent in PLoS Medicine, 4.9 percent in The Annals of Internal Medicine, and 2 percent in Nature Medicine.

NEJM editors told the Times that they were "puzzled" by and "skeptical" of the results.

The Scan

Highly Similar

Researchers have uncovered bat viruses that are highly similar to SARS-CoV-2, according to Nature News.

Gain of Oversight

According to the Wall Street Journal, the Biden Administration is considering greater oversight of gain-of-function research.

Lasker for mRNA Vaccine Work

The Scientist reports that researchers whose work enabled the development of mRNA-based vaccines are among this year's Lasker Award winners

PLOS Papers on Causal Variant Mapping, Ancient Salmonella, ALK Fusion Test for NSCLC

In PLOS this week: MsCAVIAR approach to map causal variants, analysis of ancient Salmonella, and more.