Skip to main content
Premium Trial:

Request an Annual Quote

That'll Just Wreak Havoc at Airport Security

Emory University scientists have developed mammalian cells that produce magnetic nanoparticles to aid medical researchers in tracking cells, reports MIT's Tech Review. The scientists took a gene from pond bacteria that use small magnetic particles as a sort of compass and inserted it into mouse cells which then produced their own magnetic nanoparticles. When those mouse cells were inserted into a live mouse's brain, the cells could easily be seen on an MRI. "If genetically engineering cells to produce their own magnetic nanoparticles proves successful, this provides a new window through which to view many biological processes as they unfold, from the formation of tumors to the migration of stem cells injected to treat disease," says the article.

The Scan

Billions for Antivirals

The US is putting $3.2 billion toward a program to develop antivirals to treat COVID-19 in its early stages, the Wall Street Journal reports.

NFT of the Web

Tim Berners-Lee, who developed the World Wide Web, is auctioning its original source code as a non-fungible token, Reuters reports.

23andMe on the Nasdaq

23andMe's shares rose more than 20 percent following its merger with a special purpose acquisition company, as GenomeWeb has reported.

Science Papers Present GWAS of Brain Structure, System for Controlled Gene Transfer

In Science this week: genome-wide association study ties variants to white matter stricture in the brain, and more.