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Thank You, Viruses

Viruses have affected the development of several mammalian genomes, says Carl Zimmer at The Loom. In 2000, researchers found that the human gene syncytin — which is necessary for the gestation of offspring — may have come from a virus. "Viruses have insinuated themselves into the genome of our ancestors for hundreds of millions of years," Zimmer says. "They typically have gotten there by infecting eggs or sperm, inserting their own DNA into ours. There are 100,000 known fragments of viruses in the human genome, making up over 8% of our DNA." In 2005, French virologist Thierry Heidmann and his colleagues found that syncytins weren't just present in primates, but that a variant was present in mice as well, Zimmer adds. In 2009, Heidmann found another variant in rabbits.

In an new PNAS article, Heidmann reports his discovery of a variant of syncytin in dogs and cats, and all the other mammals that belong to the carnivoran branch, as well, Zimmer says. "The big picture that's now emerging is quite amazing. Viruses have rained down on mammals, and on at least six occasions, they've gotten snagged in their hosts and started carrying out the same function: building placentas," he adds. "The complete story will have to wait until scientists have searched every placental mammal for syncytins from viruses."

The Scan

Ancient Greek Army Ancestry Highlights Mercenary Role in Historical Migrations

By profiling genomic patterns in 5th century samples from in and around Himera, researchers saw diverse ancestry in Greek army representatives in the region, as they report in PNAS.

Estonian Biobank Team Digs into Results Return Strategies, Experiences

Researchers in the European Journal of Human Genetics outline a procedure developed for individual return of results for the population biobank, along with participant experiences conveyed in survey data.

Rare Recessive Disease Insights Found in Individual Genomes

Researchers predict in Genome Medicine cross-population deletions and autosomal recessive disease impacts by analyzing recurrent nonallelic homologous recombination-related deletions.

Genetic Tests Lead to Potential Prognostic Variants in Dutch Children With Dilated Cardiomyopathy

Researchers in Circulation: Genomic and Precision Medicine found that the presence of pathogenic or likely pathogenic variants was linked to increased risk of death and poorer outcomes in children with pediatric dilated cardiomyopathy.