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At Bioinformatics Zen, Michael Barton wonders why he should write good software -- after all, he's not developing it for commercial use. He says, though, that the commercial principles of unit testing, automated building, and source control should be applied to scientific software development. "Investing 10% extra time in developing versatile and maintainable code saves time later when large changes are required," he writes.

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Bloomberg reports that the DNA-for-cash deal reported in Kentucky might be a more widespread scam.

St. Jude Children's Research Hospital scientists have treated infants with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency using gene therapy in an early phase study.

St. Louis Public Radio reports that some African Americans are turning to DNA ancestry testing to help guide genealogical searches.

In Nature this week: a genomic analysis of the snailfish Pseudoliparis swirei, ancient DNA analysis gives insight into the introduction of farming to England, and more.

May
07
Sponsored by
Agilent

This webinar will discuss the implementation of an enterprise-wide clinical genomics platform that is shared across 10 hospitals and research organizations in the Australian State of Victoria.

Jun
17
Sponsored by
Illumina

This webinar will provide an overview of polygenic risk scores, which aggregate dozens of genetic variants that have been linked to disease risk in genome-wide association studies (GWAS) into a single score.