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Technologies on Their Last Breath?

Sage Bionetworks’ Stephen Friend lists at Xcomony five technologies that he thinks “will be relegated to museum displays in the next five (OK, maybe 10) years.” That list includes genome-wide association studies, proteomics as an “end approach” to studying disease, and “hunter-gatherer approaches” in which researchers collect clinical and genomic data from a large group, such as the Framingham cohort, to analyze themselves. Regarding GWAS, Friend writes that “single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) analysis isn’t going to last long as a major driver of biologic insight. Within the next one to two years, people will wake up to ‘ITEGS’— ‘It’s the entire genome, stupid.’” At In the Pipeline, Derek Lowe looks the list over. “I think the list is mostly correct,” he writes.

The Scan

Ancient Greek Army Ancestry Highlights Mercenary Role in Historical Migrations

By profiling genomic patterns in 5th century samples from in and around Himera, researchers saw diverse ancestry in Greek army representatives in the region, as they report in PNAS.

Estonian Biobank Team Digs into Results Return Strategies, Experiences

Researchers in the European Journal of Human Genetics outline a procedure developed for individual return of results for the population biobank, along with participant experiences conveyed in survey data.

Rare Recessive Disease Insights Found in Individual Genomes

Researchers predict in Genome Medicine cross-population deletions and autosomal recessive disease impacts by analyzing recurrent nonallelic homologous recombination-related deletions.

Genetic Tests Lead to Potential Prognostic Variants in Dutch Children With Dilated Cardiomyopathy

Researchers in Circulation: Genomic and Precision Medicine found that the presence of pathogenic or likely pathogenic variants was linked to increased risk of death and poorer outcomes in children with pediatric dilated cardiomyopathy.