Charlie Rose speaks with George Church and Steven Pinker about the Personal Genome Project and what they hope to get out of it. Pinker talks about why he doesn't want to know his ApoE4 status and why he doesn't mind letting others see his genome on the Web. "There's not a whole lot you can read from individual genes … it's not as if people can peer into my soul by having access to my genome," he says. Later in the program, Rose is joined by 23andMe's Linda Avey and Anne Wojcicki.

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