Here, we try not to talk about whatever stretch marks we may have, whether they appeared due to growth spurts, weight fluctuations, or pregnancy. They can just disappear, thank you very much.

23andMe researchers, though, took a closer look. From among their subscribers, they identified some 13,000 cases and 21,000 controls with and without stretch markers to determine whether there is a genetic influence on who develops them and who does not. They also examined a cohort of nearly 5,000 women who developed stretch marks during pregnancy.

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