The Stealthy Genome

While encryption approaches can make personal genomic data secure, they also tend to render it unusable for research, but as Science Now reports, a new method called homomorphic encryption may enable genomic data to stay private and still be usable for researchers. The encryption method was presented at the 2014 American Association for the Advancement of Science meeting. (AAAS publishes Science Now.)

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