The State of It

It's been a little more than 15 years since the kickoff of public health genomics, writes Muin Khoury, the director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Office of Public Health Genomics, at the Genomics and Health Impact Blog. With technological improvements in whole-genome sequencing, it is increasingly being applied to detect and control infectious disease outbreaks as well as to determine which people are at increased risk of developing rare and common diseases.

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