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So Quick

Many researchers are developing lab-on-a-chip devices that can be used to identify viruses, chemicals, or chromosomal aberrations using just a drop of blood, writes Alok Jha at The Guardian. "The platform blurs nanotechnology, biotechnology, and micro-electronics. And it is not specific to medicine," he says. The advantage of this approach is that not only can it be done outside of a lab, but it also requires small samples. "Potentially you can detect the presence of, for example, cancer or diabetes at a much earlier stage and then treat it more effectively," Mark Morrison, CEO of the Institute of Nanotechnology in the UK, tells Jha. "If you treat the disease earlier on, you have a much greater chance of success."

The Scan

NFTs for Genome Sharing

Nature News writes that non-fungible tokens could be a way for people to profit from sharing genomic data.

Wastewater Warning System

Time magazine writes that cities and college campuses are monitoring sewage for SARS-CoV-2, an approach officials hope lasts beyond COVID-19.

Networks to Boost Surveillance

Scientific American writes that new organizations and networks aim to improve the ability of developing countries to conduct SARS-CoV-2 genomic surveillance.

Genome Biology Papers on Gastric Cancer Epimutations, BUTTERFLY, GUNC Tool

In Genome Biology this week: recurrent epigenetic mutations in gastric cancer, correction tool for unique molecular identifier-based assays, and more.